Tasmanian Pepper Berries

$44.10
code:
HT.TASPBK
Botanical:
Tasmannia lanceolata
Origin:
Australia
Tasmanian Pepper Berries

Approx date for shipment is 4th May 2018

Mountain pepper is a tall evergreen shrub to small tree of up to 10 m high. There are separate male and female plants (dioecious). The trunk is straight, with many branches arising at acute angles. The distinctive reddish branchlets are thick and hairless, with dark brown, smooth outer bark with rough ridges running down from the base of each leaf. The under bark is also dark brown and very thinBoth the Berry and the leaf are edible - the Berry being an alternative to traditional pepper but much more versatile, nutritious and extremely high in antioxidants, while the leaf is used similarly to curry leaf. Tasmanian Pepper berry leaf can be used in cooking foods it is much hotter then pepper while stil giving the pepper flavour.

Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Tier in the North East Highlands of Tasmania at Goulds Country and Lottah. 

We harvest Native Pepper berries from several private farms that have wild pepper trees growing on fallen myrtle logs left by early pioneering farmers and on rocky outcrops in alpine paddocks.
We are continuously expanding our plantations and improving our available wild harvest through pruning and fertilising with organic fertilisers. We first planted our plantation trees in 2005 and harvested the first commercial crop in 2015.
We are a proud Tasmanian business, looking to downstream our products, create local employment, work with and support other local producers of quality Tasmanian products.

pepper berry bunches fresh pepper berries fresh pepper berry leaves fruiting pepper berry harvesting pepper berries cleaning pepper berries

Native Pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata), also known as Mountain Pepper, is a very attractive shrub, hardy in its natural environment and growing up to 10 metres in some areas but in open alpine areas may be considerably smaller.
Mountain Pepper has both male and female plants that flower in October and November with the berry ripening from April through to June.
The leaves and berries contain the active compound 'polygodial' which gives them the peppery taste.
They are high in antioxidants and antimicrobial activity. Studies are still ongoing into the medicinal and nutritional properties of this beautiful and useful plant.
The plant was very special to the indigenous Tasmanians who used both the leaves and berries for food and medicine. The berry is also a favourite food of the black currawong, that spreads the seed far and wide in its droppings, helping to establish new plants on manferns, fallen logs and disturbed rainforest areas.